Buyer Cheat Sheet for a Seller’s Market

CheatingThe home buying market started to heat up in February this year and it’s only gotten busier. The number of available houses for sale is roughly 9% lower than last year at this time and that number was lower than the year before. If you’re house hunting, here are some good tips to get you ready for what you’ll find out there. Competition can be stiff for some properties. One of my clients lost the opportunity to buy a home by only $100.00! Here are some thoughts from some other professionals about today’s housing market.

In a seller’s market, home buyers need to be willing and able to act fast to snag the home they want. This spring, areas across the country are facing a limited number of homes for sale. Realtor.com® offers up a cheat sheet for surviving a seller’s market.

Be on call. “If you’re only looking now and then when it’s convenient, you’re probably wasting your time,” says James Malmberg, a real estate professional in Sherman Oaks, Calif. He suggests treating house hunting like job hunting. If someone calls with a lead, follow up promptly to gauge whether it could be a good fit and don’t linger.

Bring the paperwork. To be taken seriously, buyers would be wise to get a mortgage pre-approval letter as well as a “proof of funds” form from their bank to show they have enough to cover a down payment. They’ll be able to act quicker when they do find the right house.

Limit the contingencies. In a seller’s market, buyers may need to drop some of the contingencies to score the house. Sellers prefer the fewest number of hurdles to closing as possible. If your buyers come in with several contingencies — such as “if” they secure financing — the sellers are more inclined to bypass their offer and take another with less hassle. Also, “don’t waste your time lowballing a seller,” advises Sean Kelley, a real estate professional with Howard Hannah in Pittsburgh, Pa. “Always put in an aggressive offer.”

Cast a wide net. Search for homes outside prime locations if faced with limited or high-priced choices. Buyers need to carefully consider what they’re willing to compromise on. “Sometimes properties sit, even in a seller’s market, because of a problem that is scaring other buyers away,” such as some renovation work that may need to be done, Malmberg says. Those “flaws,” however, might not be a big deal to your buyers. “Finding a house this way can also cut down on the amount of competition you will face,” Malmberg adds.

Source: “Surviving a Seller’s Market: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet,” realtor.com® (April 7, 2016)

If you’re in the market to buy or sell, give me a call at  and we’ll look at your situation to see what makes the most sense for you and your family.

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About bertwilliamshomes

Bert Williams has been a Tulsa/Broken Arrow resident since 1989 and was in the broadcast television equipment brokerage business for 14 years and in advertising and marketing for over 30 years. Bert joined the rapidly growing Chinowth and Cohen Real Estate team in 2005 when there were only 45 associates. Now with over 350 associates and eight offices across the Tulsa/Broken Arrow/Owasso/Bixby/Sand Springs/Bartlesville/Grand Lake areas, Bert has the support and resources through the C&C team to find the perfect home for you and at the same time find the perfect family to purchase the home you own now. In 2013, Bert became a full time Real Estate agent working from the Broken Arrow office. His experience with negotiations and with the Real Estate market dating back to 2005 give you a great advantage when you decide to buy or sell a home. Call me at 918-809-5199. I look forward to meeting you!
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